The Latest Glenn: Articles and Podcasts

I’ve published a number of interesting articles recently and had a spate of podcast appearances. Here’s a short summary. (You can also use my Authory page to see recent articles and search on the full text, and sign up to be notified about new articles.)

Articles

  • A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter the Public Domain” (the Atlantic): An amazing day is coming. January 1, 2019, for the first time since 1998, a huge number of books, films, and other works will escape U.S. copyright law. Due to a number of quirks and changes in U.S. copyright law, every year for decades, a swath of history gets brushed into the public domain at last.
  • How Facebook Devalued The Birthday” (Fast Company): What was once a private celebration has become public currency. What have we lost in the process? After this ran, a lot of resonance from people who told me they felt the same way.
  • John Henry was a type-setting man: When newspaper compositors were sporting heroes” (the Economist): In the 19th century, crowds cheered and bet on competitions to see who could set metal type fastest.
  • The Visual History of Type review (my Patreon): This remarkable book is big in every way—not just in weight and dimensions, but in scope and quality. While this article is available to everyone, I write exclusive and exclusive-for-patrons-first articles, along with other benefits, for people who contribute $1 a month or more. Read more here.
  • NASA’s On-Again, Off-Again Satellite” (Air & Space): Amateur astronomers never know what signals they might pick up. You could call this a SADellite story: the IMAGE orbiter mentioned stopped broadcasting in a way NASA could pick up, for the most part. So far, no luck in making contact again after early March.
  • Why was this season’s flu so deadly? (the Economist): Many factors, but primarily, a more virulent strain, and one that the vaccine didn't target as well as usual.

Podcasts

  • I talk Frankenstein with John McCoy on Sophomore Lit. I relied on the great book, The New Annotated Frankenstein, which encompasses aspects of the two major editions of the Mary Shelley book (1818 and 1831), parts of the original draft that survive, and a significant marked-up copy of the 1818 edition she gave to a friend that reflected some changes in direction realized in the 1831 release.
  • Quinn Rose had me on her podcast about musicals, Corner of the Sky, to let me talk, rage, blather, and sing (sometimes in German) about The Threepenny Opera, one of my favorite pieces of theatre of any kind.
  • I appear on Download, a tech podcast, in an episode called, “Put the Toothpaste Back in the Cat,” which maybe you don’t want to know what that means.
  • Holy cats, we’ve made 400 episodes of the Incomparable, and I’m about the #10 all-time guest by appearances (but #1 in your hearts). Here’s “Snellology,” our 400th episode.
  • I acted as scorekeeper (and put in some bon mots or mal mots) for the Emerald City Comic-Con live taping of Inconceivable!, a game show by Dan Moren.