Radio Free Glenning for January

My appearances on actual radio (as opposed to podcasts) goes in spates. After my Smithsonian magazine article appeared about the entry of 1923 in the U.S. into the public domain, I was asked to be on several shows.

NPR’s All Things Considered emailed me for a story, but I missed the email! They riffed off my article and spoke with Jennifer Jenkins, the director of the Center for the Study of the Public Domain at Duke Law School, my stalwart source for all things public domain, and produced a very nice brief take. (A few days later NPR’s Weekend Edition did a longer and fun interview with Jenkins and her husband, James Boyle, also a copyright and public domain expert.)

WNYC interviewed me for a brief segment on the public domain that ran on January 4.

Wisconsin Public Radio had me on for a live interview on January 7 in which I was able to get a little more deeply into issues. (An issue raised in that interview: Recorded music remains under a separate copyright regime; 1922 and earlier recorded music expires from protection Jan. 1, 2022; 1923 expires Jan. 1, 2024; and then annual regular expirations happen more or less thereafter, just as with published work of all kinds. I left a comment to explain that for listeners baffled by my aside about “Yes! We Have No Bananas.”)

On Jan. 9, I recorded a long interview with WGN in Chicago for a segment aired Jan. 13 on the same topic.

Finally, I spoke recently with my friend Anze at Slovenia’s national radio network—but not about the public domain! We talked about Facebook’s devaluation of the birthday. I’ll be dubbed into Slovenian! (Updated: Here’s the link.)