My second project this year

I just completed the third pass on a broadside, a fancy word for a poster, that’s a tribute to The Incomparable, a podcast network I’ve been part of since the founding of the flagship eponymous show. It now has many podcasts in the network, and we’re mostly professional amateurs: shows are produced with high quality and a lot of care, but the money that comes in mostly de minimis — we cover editing and some other expenses, but it’s not a living. 

The broadside involves multiple printing techniques and elements:

  • The background was printed using a press plate, a sort of reverse stencil placed under the paper during its impression against a large solid block that was inked on press. This created a white space for the zeppelin, and the little pointed rays around it.
  • That pass used a split fountain, in which two different ink colors were placed on the main reciprocating roller, which spins back and forth to even out ink coverage. It allows for that neat gradation effect.
  • The zeppelin is a linoleum-block cut, carved by yours truly. It's very hard to get good, solid coverage over that size, but I think it worked out fairly well. (The zeppelin is a symbol of the network.)
  • The robot is part of the podcast's logo, and after trying to carve it, I opted to send it out to be turned into a photopolymer plate. An inverse of the file (whites are blacks and blacks are transparent) is exposed onto a rubbery material that hardens where light touches. (This is done via a film transfer or direct laser exposure of the raw plate material.) The plate is sent through a liquid bath to wash away unexposed areas, and you get a printable medium!
  • The Incomparable is set in wood type and Live from Zeppellinheim in metal from the School of Visual Concepts type collection. (There should be perhaps one L in the city name, a running joke of the show, but it's a made-up name, so there you go.)
  • The paper was cut down from a larger sheet with a "deckle edge" on both top and bottom. I preserved one edge. A real deckle results from paper made by the sheet, where the pulp peters out at the edge of the form (the deckle) on which it's sluiced. I wrote about how a deckle edge (real and fake) gets made in this Economist story from 2012.

I’ve got one more project underway from this first quarter of SVC classes, and I’ll post details about it when it’s finished. It’s much simpler in outcome, but more complicated in the design process.